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Author Topic: Project Flow Chart  (Read 3228 times)

Skin_the_Sun

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Project Flow Chart
« on: March 17, 2013, 05:14:06 PM »

Thought it would be helpful (for myself and others) to get people to post a project flow chart or just a breakdown (simple or detailed) of the steps they would take for an average kit.

For instance, if I wasn't going to paint, it might look something like this:


-Remove parts from runners (place in labelled plastic bags)
 
-Clean up nub marks w/ knife and maybe sanding tools

-Assemble kit

-Disassemble into various sections (ie. legs, arms, head, torso etc.)

-Gundam markers for panel lines (GM01)

-Apply decals (Mr. Mark Softer and Mr. Mark Setter)

-Flat coat various sections (Tamiya TS-80)

-Assemble Kit

Finish!
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thepuddingcup11

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2013, 05:42:43 PM »

i do the same but clean each part as i remove it and put it together straight away
(straight from the runner is a better way of saying it)
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 07:53:59 PM by thepuddingcup11 »
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TheGhostofZeon

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2013, 05:59:39 PM »

I've never understood why people take everything off the runners first before assembling. Wouldn't that just make assembly much longer if you need to root around in a big pile of parts to find the right one?

I build it straight from the runner, its much easier that way.

QuangVuong

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 06:29:04 PM »

If Im painting, then I would cut all parts of 1 colour from the runner, then paint it. For the inner frame I just paint onto the runners. If Im not painting, then individual parts are cut, knifed, etc.
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fury-s12

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2013, 06:55:05 PM »

I've never understood why people take everything off the runners first before assembling. Wouldn't that just make assembly much longer if you need to root around in a big pile of parts to find the right one?

I build it straight from the runner, its much easier that way.

Having just done both I will say it's nice to have all the bits prepared in groups and just go on a build spree with boo clipping, trimming or Sanding but otherwise if your doing a test build then pull down style there's no real benefit plus as you said you lose the numbering
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Ethan

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2013, 07:31:58 PM »

I double GoZ's question. Having taken the parts off the runners first for a build, it takes heaps longer during the assembly step. Also, I don't understand why you have to disassmble the parts then decal/panel line then top coat. Can't you do the whole thing while it's all assembled??
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Skin_the_Sun

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2013, 08:33:13 PM »

Good points guys. I have previously just removed from runners and and assembled straight away but I read (Major William's Blog) that removing all>cleaning>then assembling is a good way to do it some I'm trying it out for my current build (although I am painting this one, so maybe it's not helpful for a kit that is not being painted). I don't really see much point in a test build, so I believe this will make it easier when I do assemble post priming/painting as I am keeping the parts in bags relevant to gate designations. If I did do a test build then disassemble however, wouldn't I have to either order the parts somehow or search through a big pile in order to find what I need? Before any priming/painting I mean?

@Ethan, I separated the parts (just into main sections - ie. head, torso etc.) of my last build before flat coating because I didn't want to get an even spray on sections that might otherwise be covered by overlapping parts. I think I asked on this forum and people said to top coat like this. As for decals and panel lines, I found it much easier to get a stable purchase and be precise when I only had, say a leg part, as opposed to a fully assembled kit.

Bottom line is though, I'm only asking because I'm a relative noob and I was hoping to get examples from builders like yourselves who are much more experienced than I am. I kind of just wanted to give an example of the format, I am sure my process is pretty flawed due to lack of experience.  ;D
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Ethan

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 08:49:48 PM »

Oh, and another tip. When you flat coat a kit that has some sort of special coating or colour like a gun metallish effect for the internals, it's best to take off all the parts and only flat coat the armor. That way you don't ruin the finish on the internals.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 08:50:31 PM by Ethan »
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Falldog

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2013, 05:03:06 AM »

You guys really need to check out my guide more often ;)

http://otakurevolution.com/content/laymans-gunpla-guide-gunpla-flowchart

Frontl1ne

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2013, 10:19:51 AM »

After doing this hobby for so long, all of these steps just seem to be common sense haha.

The way I do my kits (just stock standard painted kits)

1. Build model according to manual
2. Disassemble into individual sections (torso, head etc)
3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour
4. Re-assemble into individual sections and gloss coat (I don't find gloss coat here to be necessary)
5. Decals
7. Re-assemble complete model and final top coat

I have about 5 or 6 tofu boxes which house each section of the model which is helpful for keeping dust out both before and after painting. I find painting to be the most difficult/time consuming part, especially if you're hand painting the whole thing.
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dj898

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2013, 03:37:38 PM »

ok here's dad's take~

1. Save money for the kit and then spend on things for kids
2. Save again and spend on things for missus
3. Save again and finally buy the kit
4. Managed to bring it in without missus finding out
5. Opened the box & Read manual & closed/put aside
6. Opened the box and closed/put aside
7. Wait till everyone have gone bed and then open the box and closed/put aside coz little one had woken up
8. Wait till everyone have gone bed and then open the box and then cut off all the parts and put them into small containers per section
9. Trim and sand when ever there's chance of free time - which isn't much sadly
10. Rinse & Repeat (9) till all parts are done
11. Assemble, put aside till the assembly is done
12. Disassemble & sand and glue
13. Rinse & repeat (12) till all components are done
14. Put them back into the box and wait till missus take kids to in-law's house for annual visit
15. Pull out all the necessary gears and tackle it full on
16. Rinse & repeat (15) till the painting is all done
17. Finish the kit and put it into the box and store away - unless you don't mind kids take it and play it with their Barbie dolls~ :x
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Shaid

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2013, 03:58:12 PM »

You forgot the part where you lose the ankle joints somewhere between 9 and 14. :P

Skin_the_Sun

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2013, 05:05:36 PM »

Cool, these are all really great tips and examples.

Falldog, I've come across your chart before, It's really awesome and super-helpful.  ;D

"3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour" - Frontl1ne, could you elaborate on this step? I'm interested to hear more about how you do this. Do you mean that you just take any 10 pieces that are the same colour and paint them in one go, then move on? Are the pieces all from a certain section? ie. head, torso, etc.
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Frontl1ne

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2013, 06:57:42 PM »

"3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour" - Frontl1ne, could you elaborate on this step? I'm interested to hear more about how you do this. Do you mean that you just take any 10 pieces that are the same colour and paint them in one go, then move on? Are the pieces all from a certain section? ie. head, torso, etc.

Yeah, nothing special. I pick 10 because that's all I can fit on my foam board lol, and also because the paint dries by the time I get through one round of them so I can starting painting the first one again after the last one.

I generally try to pick from the same section so I can start building some pieces together but that's just me being impatient and wanting to see the final thing haha.

Edit: I would love to hear if people have a more efficient way of painting though. It takes me about 20 minutes to do the 10 pieces, and if a kit has ~500 pieces... well... haha. Also for reference, it used to take me over an hour to do the 10 pieces when painting by hand :)
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 06:59:21 PM by Frontl1ne »
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tristan

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Re: Project Flow Chart
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2013, 08:45:24 PM »

My steps

1) build the thing
2) paint the thing
3) put on shelf

;)
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