Gundam Australia Forum

The Flight Deck => Engineering Corps => Topic started by: Skin_the_Sun on March 17, 2013, 05:14:06 PM

Title: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Skin_the_Sun on March 17, 2013, 05:14:06 PM
Thought it would be helpful (for myself and others) to get people to post a project flow chart or just a breakdown (simple or detailed) of the steps they would take for an average kit.

For instance, if I wasn't going to paint, it might look something like this:


-Remove parts from runners (place in labelled plastic bags)
 
-Clean up nub marks w/ knife and maybe sanding tools

-Assemble kit

-Disassemble into various sections (ie. legs, arms, head, torso etc.)

-Gundam markers for panel lines (GM01)

-Apply decals (Mr. Mark Softer and Mr. Mark Setter)

-Flat coat various sections (Tamiya TS-80)

-Assemble Kit

Finish!
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: thepuddingcup11 on March 17, 2013, 05:42:43 PM
i do the same but clean each part as i remove it and put it together straight away
(straight from the runner is a better way of saying it)
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: TheGhostofZeon on March 17, 2013, 05:59:39 PM
I've never understood why people take everything off the runners first before assembling. Wouldn't that just make assembly much longer if you need to root around in a big pile of parts to find the right one?

I build it straight from the runner, its much easier that way.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: QuangVuong on March 17, 2013, 06:29:04 PM
If Im painting, then I would cut all parts of 1 colour from the runner, then paint it. For the inner frame I just paint onto the runners. If Im not painting, then individual parts are cut, knifed, etc.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: fury-s12 on March 17, 2013, 06:55:05 PM
I've never understood why people take everything off the runners first before assembling. Wouldn't that just make assembly much longer if you need to root around in a big pile of parts to find the right one?

I build it straight from the runner, its much easier that way.

Having just done both I will say it's nice to have all the bits prepared in groups and just go on a build spree with boo clipping, trimming or Sanding but otherwise if your doing a test build then pull down style there's no real benefit plus as you said you lose the numbering
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Ethan on March 17, 2013, 07:31:58 PM
I double GoZ's question. Having taken the parts off the runners first for a build, it takes heaps longer during the assembly step. Also, I don't understand why you have to disassmble the parts then decal/panel line then top coat. Can't you do the whole thing while it's all assembled??
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Skin_the_Sun on March 17, 2013, 08:33:13 PM
Good points guys. I have previously just removed from runners and and assembled straight away but I read (Major William's Blog) that removing all>cleaning>then assembling is a good way to do it some I'm trying it out for my current build (although I am painting this one, so maybe it's not helpful for a kit that is not being painted). I don't really see much point in a test build, so I believe this will make it easier when I do assemble post priming/painting as I am keeping the parts in bags relevant to gate designations. If I did do a test build then disassemble however, wouldn't I have to either order the parts somehow or search through a big pile in order to find what I need? Before any priming/painting I mean?

@Ethan, I separated the parts (just into main sections - ie. head, torso etc.) of my last build before flat coating because I didn't want to get an even spray on sections that might otherwise be covered by overlapping parts. I think I asked on this forum and people said to top coat like this. As for decals and panel lines, I found it much easier to get a stable purchase and be precise when I only had, say a leg part, as opposed to a fully assembled kit.

Bottom line is though, I'm only asking because I'm a relative noob and I was hoping to get examples from builders like yourselves who are much more experienced than I am. I kind of just wanted to give an example of the format, I am sure my process is pretty flawed due to lack of experience.  ;D
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Ethan on March 17, 2013, 08:49:48 PM
Oh, and another tip. When you flat coat a kit that has some sort of special coating or colour like a gun metallish effect for the internals, it's best to take off all the parts and only flat coat the armor. That way you don't ruin the finish on the internals.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Falldog on March 18, 2013, 05:03:06 AM
You guys really need to check out my guide more often ;)

http://otakurevolution.com/content/laymans-gunpla-guide-gunpla-flowchart
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Frontl1ne on March 18, 2013, 10:19:51 AM
After doing this hobby for so long, all of these steps just seem to be common sense haha.

The way I do my kits (just stock standard painted kits)

1. Build model according to manual
2. Disassemble into individual sections (torso, head etc)
3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour
4. Re-assemble into individual sections and gloss coat (I don't find gloss coat here to be necessary)
5. Decals
7. Re-assemble complete model and final top coat

I have about 5 or 6 tofu boxes which house each section of the model which is helpful for keeping dust out both before and after painting. I find painting to be the most difficult/time consuming part, especially if you're hand painting the whole thing.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: dj898 on March 18, 2013, 03:37:38 PM
ok here's dad's take~

1. Save money for the kit and then spend on things for kids
2. Save again and spend on things for missus
3. Save again and finally buy the kit
4. Managed to bring it in without missus finding out
5. Opened the box & Read manual & closed/put aside
6. Opened the box and closed/put aside
7. Wait till everyone have gone bed and then open the box and closed/put aside coz little one had woken up
8. Wait till everyone have gone bed and then open the box and then cut off all the parts and put them into small containers per section
9. Trim and sand when ever there's chance of free time - which isn't much sadly
10. Rinse & Repeat (9) till all parts are done
11. Assemble, put aside till the assembly is done
12. Disassemble & sand and glue
13. Rinse & repeat (12) till all components are done
14. Put them back into the box and wait till missus take kids to in-law's house for annual visit
15. Pull out all the necessary gears and tackle it full on
16. Rinse & repeat (15) till the painting is all done
17. Finish the kit and put it into the box and store away - unless you don't mind kids take it and play it with their Barbie dolls~ :x
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Shaid on March 18, 2013, 03:58:12 PM
You forgot the part where you lose the ankle joints somewhere between 9 and 14. :P
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Skin_the_Sun on March 18, 2013, 05:05:36 PM
Cool, these are all really great tips and examples.

Falldog, I've come across your chart before, It's really awesome and super-helpful.  ;D

"3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour" - Frontl1ne, could you elaborate on this step? I'm interested to hear more about how you do this. Do you mean that you just take any 10 pieces that are the same colour and paint them in one go, then move on? Are the pieces all from a certain section? ie. head, torso, etc.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Frontl1ne on March 18, 2013, 06:57:42 PM
"3. Prime and paint in batches of ~10 of the same colour" - Frontl1ne, could you elaborate on this step? I'm interested to hear more about how you do this. Do you mean that you just take any 10 pieces that are the same colour and paint them in one go, then move on? Are the pieces all from a certain section? ie. head, torso, etc.

Yeah, nothing special. I pick 10 because that's all I can fit on my foam board lol, and also because the paint dries by the time I get through one round of them so I can starting painting the first one again after the last one.

I generally try to pick from the same section so I can start building some pieces together but that's just me being impatient and wanting to see the final thing haha.

Edit: I would love to hear if people have a more efficient way of painting though. It takes me about 20 minutes to do the 10 pieces, and if a kit has ~500 pieces... well... haha. Also for reference, it used to take me over an hour to do the 10 pieces when painting by hand :)
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: tristan on March 18, 2013, 08:45:24 PM
My steps

1) build the thing
2) paint the thing
3) put on shelf

;)
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: fury-s12 on March 18, 2013, 08:58:02 PM
My steps

1) build the thing
2) paint the thing
3) put on shelf
4) Repeat 10 times within an hour
;)

FTFY
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: thegunny on March 18, 2013, 09:21:28 PM
My steps

1) build the thing
2) paint the thing
3) put on shelf
4) Repeat 10 times within an hour
;)

FTFY

You left out the part about sticking them in plastic bags.

GHRT
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Ethan on March 18, 2013, 09:23:05 PM
@Frontl1ne: Paint the parts in terms of colours, not sections. That way, you don't have to switch paints a million times while painting something that's fairly simple.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Skin_the_Sun on March 19, 2013, 12:19:32 AM
My steps

1) build the thing
2) paint the thing
3) put on shelf

;)
Thanks tristan, very concise.  ;D
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: tristan on March 19, 2013, 07:08:13 AM
@Frontl1ne: Paint the parts in terms of colours, not sections. That way, you don't have to switch paints a million times while painting something that's fairly simple.

Id actually disagree with this.

I paint in sections (head, arms, chest, legs, weapons) and if prebuilt and pegged on clips (or whatever you use), you can still paint by colour but you reduce the risk of scratching parts etc in the construction process. This is for both airbrushing and hand painting- obviously airbrushing requires masking but the reduction of paint chipping is worth it as touchups are a bitch when airbrushing IMO.
Keeping in mind I mainly hand brush but even then, touchups can be noticeable depending on the colour


@ fury and Gunny.....:P
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Atchy on March 19, 2013, 10:18:00 AM
@Frontl1ne: Paint the parts in terms of colours, not sections. That way, you don't have to switch paints a million times while painting something that's fairly simple.

Id actually disagree with this.

I paint in sections (head, arms, chest, legs, weapons) and if prebuilt and pegged on clips (or whatever you use), you can still paint by colour but you reduce the risk of scratching parts etc in the construction process. This is for both airbrushing and hand painting- obviously airbrushing requires masking but the reduction of paint chipping is worth it as touchups are a bitch when airbrushing IMO.
Keeping in mind I mainly hand brush but even then, touchups can be noticeable depending on the colour


@ fury and Gunny.....:P

Yeah I'm experimenting with this atm. My last 2 kits (a HG Gundam Aegis and Dom trooper) were painted in color sections, and it took a hell of a long time. The last bit of painting the dom was weathering and details, and I found even though I was switching colors a lot it didn't slow me down. So for my next build, Evangelion 01, I've already built the thing and will do it in physical sections.


As my background is military and wargaming models I've found the concept of Gunpla in "leaving some sections unpainted cause the plastics are pre colored" to be an odd one. Indeed I've been told MG kits arn't usually painted (that can't be right can it?). Because of this I leave no surface unpainted on my HG kits (except well hidden moving joints). Force of habit I suppose but I'm never happy with the plastic look if I can avoid it. But I tell you what it makes the build a lot longer :P
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Sonar on March 19, 2013, 11:57:39 AM
lol @ dj ;D

My process:

1. Build
2. Prime
3. ? ? ? ?
4. Profit
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: fury-s12 on March 19, 2013, 12:38:09 PM
haha dam, i saw you posted here and i was ready to modify the post and remove everything past primer and leave a FTFY, but you beat me too it lol
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Shaid on March 19, 2013, 03:13:39 PM
As my background is military and wargaming models I've found the concept of Gunpla in "leaving some sections unpainted cause the plastics are pre colored" to be an odd one. Indeed I've been told MG kits arn't usually painted (that can't be right can it?). Because of this I leave no surface unpainted on my HG kits (except well hidden moving joints). Force of habit I suppose but I'm never happy with the plastic look if I can avoid it. But I tell you what it makes the build a lot longer :P
Unpainted gunpla are usually referred to as either OOB (out-of-the-box) or snapbuilt. You'll find most of us here paint our MGs, though.

Nothing wrong with painting the bits that you're not changing, though you can be lazy and just flatcoat->panelwash->weather them. ;)
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: Kjasi on March 20, 2013, 07:42:40 PM
My Process:

1) Work on the model for about an hour.
2) Use excuse of work, life or exhaustion get in the way of continuing soon.
3) Leave on work-desk or on paint rack until layer of dust appears.
4) Dust off model with renewed vigor!
5) Go to step 1.

It's a slow process, but it seems to work for the most part. Would love to have Sonar's Process...
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: mokana_man on March 25, 2013, 03:53:56 AM
-Build to instructions
-glue/ fill seam lines as required
-extra works like modification
-pull apart mask polly caps, ball joints ect. with blu tack, remove any parts not requiring paint. Parts mounted on clips unless kit is from 1980's.
-Prime, sand fill imperfections and prime again
-paint, clear coat if needed then cries
-panel line then decal
-Matt then weathering if needed
-photo then cries again
-Profit

Unpainted gunpla are usually referred to as either OOB (out-of-the-box) or snapbuilt.

Years ago 90% of OOB kits was painted, unpainted kits were normally cars and snap fit revell sc-fi. Things have changed since the 90's.
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: tristan on March 26, 2013, 06:38:07 PM
Lots of crying going on  Alan....... Ya big softie!
Title: Re: Project Flow Chart
Post by: mokana_man on March 27, 2013, 12:04:38 PM
Lots of crying going on  Alan....... Ya big softie!

HAHAHA

Chick dig a softie these days.